Disgruntled Siyanyanzela informal settlement residents in Strand took to the streets to protest empty housing promises.
Disgruntled Siyanyanzela informal settlement residents in Strand took to the streets to protest empty housing promises.

Strand residents ‘to boycott elections’ over ‘empty’ relocation promises

By Odwa Mkentane Time of article published Oct 28, 2021

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CAPE TOWN - Residents living on Sanral land in Strand have vowed not to vote in the upcoming local government elections due to “empty housing relocation promises.”

While holding demonstrations on Wednesday, Siyanyanzela informal settlement community activist Mafuzi Kalakala said they were told in 2014 that alternative provisions would be made for them.

Mayco member for human settlements Malusi Booi said land identification and acquisition was underway for the permanent relocation.

Malusi said this is in terms of the Implementation Protocol (IP) that has been signed between the City and Sanral.

“Sanral is undertaking an upgrade in that particular area. Informal settlements which are to be impacted must be relocated.

“In terms of the IP, it is envisaged that the first houses will be completed during the 2024/25 financial year.

“The City, together with Sanral, is developing work plans that will provide more details on when each affected informal settlement will be relocated.

“We will be meeting with the community’s leadership tomorrow to discuss their grievances and the way forward.”

The City said ontinued land invasions negatively impact on its ability to comply with its constitutional mandate.

“In 2017, there were 14 289 land invasions in the City. In 2018, that number had increased to 87 500 land invasions and by 2018, 232 8559 ha of City owned land had been lost to unlawful occupiers.

“By 2020, this figure increased to 241 4671 ha.

“It is not only the City that is impacted by these largely orchestrated unlawful occupations. By June 2020, 338 743 ha of State and privately owned land in the City had been unlawfully occupied, of which 73% is City owned land. An additional 25,5 ha of City land has been lost in 2021.

“In order to regain the use of unlawfully occupied land, the City must approach the courts to obtain eviction orders in terms of the Prevention of Illegal Eviction from and Unlawful Occupation of Land Act (PIE). The City finds itself in an untenable situation as a result of the DMA Regulations.

Cape Times

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