In Island informal Settlement, Khayelitsha a 29-year-old mother was arrested in relation to burying her infant near her shack.
In Island informal Settlement, Khayelitsha a 29-year-old mother was arrested in relation to burying her infant near her shack.

Two infant bodies discovered in the city in the space of a week

By Odwa Mkentane Time of article published Jul 22, 2021

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Cape Town - The bodies of two infants have been discovered within a week in separate incidents in the city.

In Island informal Settlement, Khayelitsha a 29-year-old mother was arrested in relation to burying her infant near her shack house on Saturday. The body was discovered by police while they were attending to the scene of a separate crime.

On Tuesday in Samora Machel, Joe Slovo another decomposed body of an infant was found wrapped in a green plastic bag at what has become a local dumping site.

Police spokesperson Joseph Swartbooi said Samora Machel police are investigating the latest incident.

“According to reports, residents called the station and alerted them about a possible concealment of birth. Investigations into the matter continue,” said Swartbooi.

Samora Machel Community Leader Xolani Joja said the infant’s body was discovered by residents after a dog showed interest in the bag.

Joja said a nearby pond and children’s park was dangerous and used as a dumping site.

“There is a pond with reeds and next to it is a vandalised children’s park and this is where residents use as a dumping area. Five years back a body of a man was discovered with stab wounds at the same place. We are now concerned about the safety of our people.

“I had a meeting with residents in the area and urged them to stop using the park as a dumping site. I will engage with the City to fence the area including the pond because this is now becoming a norm that the bodies are being dumped. I also... urge (women) to at least take a baby to a social worker or any organisation that deals with unwanted babies or infants,” said Joja.

Ilitha Labantu spokesperson Siyabulela Monakali said the organisation is deeply concerned by the increased number of incidents of this nature in townships and informal settlements in the province.

“There are places of care that are willing to take in unwanted infants, stronger efforts need to be implemented to educate our communities about services that are available and will assist in situations where there are unwanted infants, this will go a long way in preventing the untimely death of another infant,” said Monakali.

Cape Times

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