Martin Meyer walked through one of the many fences with holes at Burman Bush Nature Reserve. These holes have become entry and escape points for criminals who rob people at the reserve.     Gcina Ndwalane African News Agency (ANA)
Martin Meyer walked through one of the many fences with holes at Burman Bush Nature Reserve. These holes have become entry and escape points for criminals who rob people at the reserve. Gcina Ndwalane African News Agency (ANA)
Martin Meyer walked through one of the many fences with holes at Burman Bush Nature Reserve. These holes have become entry and escape points for criminals who rob people at the reserve.     Gcina Ndwalane African News Agency (ANA)
Martin Meyer walked through one of the many fences with holes at Burman Bush Nature Reserve. These holes have become entry and escape points for criminals who rob people at the reserve. Gcina Ndwalane African News Agency (ANA)
Durban - Crimes committed at nature reserves could have a huge negative economic impact because of the bad publicity they generate, said Crispin Hemson, director at the International Centre of Non-violence at the Durban University of Technology.

He was speaking at a media briefing at Burman Bush Nature Reserve yesterday, which focused on how the eThekwini Municipality was going to try and stem the crime wave at the park, which resulted in the death of musician Simon Milliken of the KwaZulu-Natal Philharmonic Orchestra.

Hemson said tourism would be affected, but the economic impact would be greater.

He said research showed that the cost of promoting non-violence was cheaper in comparison to responding to violence.

“If we can reduce these incidents, the economic impact is positive.” Hemson said.

He personally knew British-born Milliken, saying he was a great nature lover who interacted with locals and saw the value of the natural environment locally.

Garth Kloppenborg, of Scouts South Africa, said they had a lease in the nature reserve to conduct their activities. “We had a campsite, and about four or five years ago it was vandalised and demolished. We couldn’t defend it fast enough.”

Thembinkosi Ngcobo, the city’s head of parks and recreation, admitted this was not the first time someone was killed at the reserve.


         Durban councillor, Martin Meyer shows how easy it is for criminals to enter the Burman Bush nature reserve

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