High Court dismisses Shell and Mantashe’s leave to appeal judgment that halted Shell’s seismic survey on the West Coast

The NSPCA described it as another success against Shell’s seismic survey. Photo: File

The NSPCA described it as another success against Shell’s seismic survey. Photo: File

Published Feb 20, 2022

Share

DURBAN – The National Council of SPCAs (NSPCA) has celebrated another victory against Shell’s seismic survey after the Makhanda High Court dismissed Shell and Minerals and Energy Minister Gwede Mantashe’s leave to appeal the judgment that halted Shell’s seismic survey on the West Coast.

The NSPCA dubbed it as another success against Shell’s seismic survey on Thursday morning.

“The honourable Judge Gerald Bloem has dismissed Minister Gwede Mantashe and Shell’s application to appeal a ruling that has temporarily brought Shell’s Seismic survey on the West Coast to a halt,” the NSPCA said.

Explaining, the NSPCA said the survey would have consisted of air guns being blasted into the sea every 10 seconds and 24 hours a day, in search of oil and gas beneath the seabed.

The NSPCA said the interim interdict will remain in place until the main application brought against Shell by Wild Coast communities is heard in court later this year.

The main application aimed to set aside Shell’s exploration rights.

“The NSPCA and its staff affirm their stance against Shell, and continue to refrain from using any of their services,” the NSPCA said.

Earlier this month, Durban hosted 26 environmental organisations who came together from as far as Port Nolloth on the West Coast to Hluhluwe on the East Coast in solidarity against oil and gas exploration.

The organisations hosted by the South Durban Community Environmental Alliance included activists, ocean lovers, researchers, legal advisers and fishers.

The meeting comes when at least 14 applicants representing civil society, fishing communities and other affected parties await the outcome of their Western Cape High Court application to halt seismic activities by the Australian company Searcher Seismic using the vessel BGP Pioneer, which was sighted near St Helena Bay.

The seismic blasting in search of hydrocarbons on the West Coast will have a social, economic and environmental effect, according to papers lodged in court.

The two-part application was filed on January 21, and seeks to urgently interdict the seismic activities as well as declare Mantashe’s decision to grant the reconnaissance permit unlawful.

Daily News

Related Topics:

High Court