A model displays Sony Corp\'s new digital high definition video camera HDR-FX1 during a press preview in Tokyo Tuesday, Sept. 7, 2004. The electronics and entertainmenht giant sets the world\'s first high definition home video camera to go on sale next month in Japan and before the end of the year globally. The 2 kilogram (4.4 pounds)  set sells for about 400,000 yen (US$3,600; euro 3,000) and can play current digital video cassette tapes for format compatibility with older models. But Sony will also start selling a video cassette that\'s best suited for high-definition digital recordings.  (AP Photo/Chiaki Tsukumo)
A model displays Sony Corp\'s new digital high definition video camera HDR-FX1 during a press preview in Tokyo Tuesday, Sept. 7, 2004. The electronics and entertainmenht giant sets the world\'s first high definition home video camera to go on sale next month in Japan and before the end of the year globally. The 2 kilogram (4.4 pounds) set sells for about 400,000 yen (US$3,600; euro 3,000) and can play current digital video cassette tapes for format compatibility with older models. But Sony will also start selling a video cassette that\'s best suited for high-definition digital recordings. (AP Photo/Chiaki Tsukumo)

SA doccie gets festival honours

By Kamcilla Pillay Time of article published Jun 14, 2012

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South African documentary Dear Mandela won big at the Brooklyn Film Festival this week.

The film, directed by KwaZulu-Natal-born Dara Kell and Christopher Nizza scooped the Grand Chameleon Award for best film and documentary at the closing night ceremony of the festival.

The film, which focuses on the eviction of shack dwellers, begins when the South African government promises to “eradicate the slums”.

The story centres on three friends who live in Durban’s vast shantytowns and refuse to be moved.

Dear Mandela follows their journey from their shacks to the highest court in the land as they invoke Nelson Mandela’s example and become leaders in a growing social movement,” reads its description on the festival’s website.

It is inspiring, devastating and funny, and offers a new perspective on the role young people could play in political change, according to the website.

Kell is an award-winning South African film-maker and has edited documentaries about international justice and prison reform.

On the Dear Mandela website, Kell wrote: I was born in Newcastle in 1980 and grew up during the height of popular protest against apartheid... Witnessing the birth of a new nation in my early teens sowed the seeds of my film-making career.”

Nizza is a New York City-born film-maker and editor whose work includes commercials, music videos, documentaries and Emmy Award-winning television work.

The film had also won Best South African Documentary at the Durban International Film Festival, Movies That Matter’s Golden Butterfly award and was an African Academy Award nominee for Best Documentary.

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