Staff of Durban based Centre for the Rehabilitation Of Wildlife (CROW) with the Egyptian Geese. Picture by CROW
Staff of Durban based Centre for the Rehabilitation Of Wildlife (CROW) with the Egyptian Geese. Picture by CROW
The staff of Durban based Centre for the Rehabilitation Of Wildlife (CROW) with the Egyptian Geese. Picture by CROW
The staff of Durban based Centre for the Rehabilitation Of Wildlife (CROW) with the Egyptian Geese. Picture by CROW

Durban - There was a bit of drama and humour at the Durban Botanic Gardens when a group of wildlife volunteers tried to catch an Egyptian Goose thats legs had become entangled with a fishing line. 

Chandre de Bruyn, spokesperson for Centre for Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW), said they were called out to rescue the goose at the weekend. 

"It took our clinic staff member, Andrew Butt, and international volunteer, Marion Desson, a good couple of tries before they could finally catch the goose. With the goose still being able to fly, it made catching him a bit trickier! "de Bruyn said. 

Safely secured in the caring arms of the team and a kind-hearted member of the public, Butt was able to remove all of the fishing lines. The team did so without having to remove the goose from its environment. With no diagnosed injuries, the CROW team were very happy to release the goose for a second chance at a free and sustainable life in the wild," de Bruyn said. 

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