A small group of people - including a man driving a hearse with a coffin - turned up at King Dinizulu Park to support the People Against Petrol and Parrafin  Price Increases (Papppi) on Monday. Picutres Zainul Dawood.
A small group of people - including a man driving a hearse with a coffin - turned up at King Dinizulu Park to support the People Against Petrol and Parrafin Price Increases (Papppi) on Monday. Picutres Zainul Dawood.
A small group of people - including a man driving a hearse with a coffin - turned up at King Dinizulu Park to support the People Against Petrol and Parrafin  Price Increases (Papppi) on Monday. Picutres Zainul Dawood.
A small group of people - including a man driving a hearse with a coffin - turned up at King Dinizulu Park to support the People Against Petrol and Parrafin Price Increases (Papppi) on Monday. Picutres Zainul Dawood.

Durban - A small group of people - including a man driving a hearse with a coffin - turned up at King Dinizulu Park to support the People Against Petrol and Parrafin  Price Increases (PAPPPI) protest on Monday.

It was not the thousands as predicted by PAPPPI convener, Visvin Reddy, who had hoped that the protest would have brought all major routes to a standstill.

He had hoped that motorists supporting his cause would blockade the N3 and all major highways on Monday in protest to rising fuel prices.

Supporters numbering around 50 people held placards on the roadside to attract the attention of motorists. A coffin with the words fuel prices must fall set the scene for the protest. 

Organisers said the coffin was symbolic to how fuel prices were killing ordinary South Africans.

Reddy said he hoped the protest would get the government’s attention.

He claimed, PAPPPI's executives already had representation from religious leaders, the Black First Land First (BLF), National People’s Ambassadors and amabutho (traditional leaders).

“Various religious leaders and political parties have been in talks with us about supporting our cause,” said Reddy.

He said Pappi’s biggest fear was that the petrol price could soar to R20/litre before the end of the year.

“We’ve heard from experts that Brent crude oil prices are expected to rise and economists have also told us that the rand is expected to lose further value over the rest of the year,’ said Reddy.

The price of oil and the strength of the rand was what the government used to set fuel prices. 

Reddy said that shouldn’t be the case because we are a fuel producing nation.

“It costs Sasol R2.71 to produce a litre of fuel and it is not affected by the price of Brent crude oil or the rand’s value. Besides we have plenty of coal reserves. Sasol is over-producing petrol and it is being sold to other African countries at less than R10/litre. We are calling on the government to nationalise Sasol and produce more fuel. In that way we can pay around R8 at the pumps," he said.

Daily News