Initially, origami was used only for decoration, entertainment or art purposes, but is now also applied in science and technology fields around the world.
Initially, origami was used only for decoration, entertainment or art purposes, but is now also applied in science and technology fields around the world.

Origami can improve your child’s learning skills and creativity

By MaryAnne Isaac Time of article published Apr 3, 2021

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Durban - The creativity and art behind turning an ordinary piece of paper into something decorative or useful – without the use of glue, scissors or tape – is quite fascinating for children, both young and old.

Origami, an ancient Japanese art-form of paper folding, can help enhance your child’s thinking skills, mathematics, problem solving, creativity and improve spatial perception, and logical and sequential thinking.

Initially, origami was used only for decoration, entertainment or art purposes (pizza boxes, cake boxes, paper planes, envelopes, paper boats), but now origami is applied in science and technology fields around the world.

A paper boat.

An envelope.

Here are examples of the modern-day forms of origami in science and tech fields, according to the Bibliotheca Alexandrina Planetarium Science Centre.

Architecture and civil engineering: Origami is used in the manufacturing of miniature models of bridges and stadiums.

Medicine: Paper folding techniques are used to embody the cell membrane and protein, and are used in modelling DNA samples.

• Mechanical engineering: Origami techniques were used in the pipes of the Japanese high speed trains. In-pipe supports were used to absorb the excess pressure; thus reducing the risk of accidents.

• Mathematics: Some teachers currently use origami as an educational tool which helps in clarifying geometry, explaining fractions, and solving problems.

• Space technology: There are plans to launch an aircraft made using origami techniques into space. Tests have already been implemented in 2008, but it has not been launched yet. Researchers have also found that origami helps learners perform better in maths, as it contributes to the learner’s geometric construction, determining geometric and algebraic formulas, and increasing manual dexterity. It also assists learners by merging Science,Technology, Engineering, Art, and Maths – STEAM.

According to art and crafts experts at Red Ted Art, origami also has wellness and social skills benefits and is often used in therapeutic environments.

“It is fantastic for co-operative learning, as children learn to work together and support each other. It breaks down age barriers – an older child may be able to teach a younger one.

“And is also a great way to learn about other cultures and communities.”

Origami is also a wonderful way to bond with your children.

You can make paper boats, paper jets or even Christmas decorations.

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