Eminem. Picture: Bang Showbiz

Eminem fans could soon be able to own part of the royalties to his biggest hits if production do Bass Brothers get their auction approved.

The Bass Brothers - Mark and Jeff Bass - who were the first to sign the rap megastar are offering fans the chance to own a share in the royalties to the songs the 'My Name Is' hitmaker released from 1999 to 2013, with a minimum price of $2,250 (R30 454). 

The pair have launched a new company called Royalty Flow, which will see them auction off the royalties in October.

Matthew Smith, the head of Royalty Exchange, who are running the sale, told Rolling Stone magazine: "If you own any Apple stocks, for instance, it's exactly the same.

"Not only do you potentially get to earn along with Eminem's catalogue, but you also win the ultimate bragging rights to say 'hey, I own that!' anytime you hear one of his songs."

A representative for Eminem - whose real name is Marshall Mathers - has said the 'Lose Yourself' star is in no way involved in the deal.

The spokesperson told the publication: "Eminem is not involved in any deals for the sale of recording royalties and has no connection to this company."

On Monday, Royalty Flow will submit legal documents and in three weeks time the US Securities and Exchange Commission will make a decision as to whether to approve the company's plan.

Those thinking of investing would be able to bid on 150 shares or more. 

If approved, buyers will be able to buy and sell their shares via a system similar to the stock exchange.

Bass Brothers' manager Joe Martin says the pair - who are credited as FBT Productions on Eminem's albums, including 1999's 'The Slim Shady LP' and 2000's 'The Marshall Mathers LP' - are hoping that investors will be able to buy parts of other artists' royalties as well in the future.

He said: "You're going to find a class of artists that will certainly be looking into this.

"[They'll] find out the real value of their income streams, as opposed to going to [major labels] Sony or EMI and taking a deal that looks good but may not be the best deal."