Somizi Mhlongo and Mohale Motaung. Picture: Instagram
Somizi Mhlongo and Mohale Motaung. Picture: Instagram

'Somizi and Mohale: The Union' behind the scenes

By Kedibone Modise Time of article published Mar 16, 2020

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The most-anticipated, record-breaking final episode of "Somizi and Mohale: The Union" finally hits the screens on Monday. 

The four-part wedding extravaganza has taken the crown as the show with the most views ever on its first day on Showmax, and it continues to top the streaming charts, bigger and better than any Hollywood blockbuster show. 

I chatted to the newlyweds at the special screening on Thursday to get some behind the scenes information on the making of the four-part special.

How did you decide on all those outfits? 

"So a lot of people don't know this. Mina in my head I had two outfit changes. The traditional outfit, where they dressed me at his (Mohale)'s home and the suits for the reception. Brother (pointing at Mohale) wanted six outfit changes. People think that I'm the one who’s extra...Mohale is extra.

"Mohale came up with the designs for all the outfits, I had no say because I didn’t understand why we have to change five or six times but I’m glad we did. It was so much fun," explains Somizi.

Where do you guys draw the line in terms of what you were going to share with the public and what not to be broadcast?

“The day before the traditional wedding, the public saw the gifting part but there were more sacred parts of the tradition ceremony that we asked the producers not to air. And on the white wedding ceremony part, we chose not to reveal the prices of rings and the wedding budget." 

What about speculations that most of the wedding stuff were sponsored?

"If I can show you the invoice for the flowers only, that amount alone can buy a house...the only thing that was sponsored was champagne because I’m a GH Mumm brand ambassador, but the venue sells alcohol, and they were not barging, so we had to pay corkage for all the champagne that we brought.

"I understand where they (naysayers) come from, it’s a consolation for themselves but we paid 70% of the wedding,” says Somizi in between the chuckles.

What was the most stressful part of planning both weddings?

“We both wanted different things at the wedding like maybe deciding on decor, or food for example but we had to reach a mutual agreement because we see things differently," offered Mohale.

Somizi shared: "We had nice life problems. People stress over wrong decor, the tent is skew or the cake didn’t arrive on time or the cake is melting or the designs are wrong...we stressed over just agreeing on small stuff and the compromise was easy. Like for instance, he (Mohale) wanted white, I wanted gold and we decided to go with white and gold,

"Honestly, if people could afford what we did, they would enjoy their weddings. We had the best teams...everyone had their roles versus having just one wedding planner. 

"For food, we had a different company, for the marquee we had a different company, for flowers, for security... For alcohol, we spread it individually, there was a person responsible for gin, someone else was responsible for vodka...for champagne, for water, for mixers, brandy, for wine...there was no one person who did two things."

The couple also shared their highlights from the wedding days.

"For me was when Mohale unexpectedly proposed and me walking down the aisle and seeing him waiting at the altar, that was priceless," said Somizi.

Mohale added: "For the traditional wedding, I was so happy. Everything was just amazing. Everything fell into place. Everyone that I wanted to be was there and the joys of us being able to sit there and say, ‘wow, we've reached this point’. 

"And the white wedding... it was beautiful. I've never cried like that in my life. I was in the moment all the time, which got me to remember why I'm getting married to the man I'm getting married to."

Somizi also revealed that his mother, veteran South African actress Mary Twala had a heart attack, a week before the wedding. 

"We got her out of the hospital that day...I said there was no way she was not going to be there. It was a blessing to have her there, some people put an empty chair to represent their late parent and for her to be alive, even if she was in an incubator, I would still want her there."

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