Digital artist, Michelle Benjamin, in New York in January before lockdown. Originally from Merebank, she is donating the proceeds from the sale of her art featuring Nelson Mandela to Choc.
Digital artist, Michelle Benjamin, in New York in January before lockdown. Originally from Merebank, she is donating the proceeds from the sale of her art featuring Nelson Mandela to Choc.

Art sold to help sick children

By Tanya Waterworth Time of article published Sep 19, 2020

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Durban - Art activist and humanitarian, Michelle Benjamin, has donated funds from the sale of three of her Nelson Mandela art pieces to help children with cancer.

Benjamin, who was born in Mere­bank and grew up in Phoenix, now lives in George in the Southern Cape. She said she had raised R190 000 from the sale of a single artwork and two art collections featuring Mandela.

The art was sold to a buyer in Italy.

She said R170 000 would go to Choc (Childhood Cancer Foundation SA), while R20 000 would go to the Diaz Museum in Mossel Bay.

Some of the art, created by Michelle Benjamin, which has been sold, with funds raised helping children with cancer.

Benjamin, who has exhibited around the world, including London and New York, is known globally for her digital art. She uses the proceeds to uplift the lives of others, as well as for wildlife projects, particularly saving rhinos from extinction.

Speaking from George recently, Benjamin said she was in New York just before the city was locked down, when her curator held a surprise exhibition for her.

“I thought I was going to a small social gathering and when I got there, my curator had arranged this big exhibition of my work.

“During the pandemic, my work was shown on the Big Screen Plaza and my curator also got creative and my whole collection was exhibited in shop fronts on 5th and 6th Avenue,” she said

“I’m currently working on a project for the families of health-care workers who died during Covid-19. I have been asked to do portraits of the workers as a gift for the families. So my work has continued, I’m not stopping.

“The mission statement for my foundation is ‘compassion and kindness to heal the world’. We don’t ask for donations, I sell my art to help others,” said Benjamin.

The Big Screen Plaza is a 9m digital billboard in New York overlooking the public plaza and includes the likes of John Legend and Trevor Noah.

During lockdown, Benjamin also started the “People of Purpose Zoom Talkshow” which includes influential speakers from around the globe.

Core Choc services include emotional support for children with cancer and their families, as well as accommodation and transport for families whose children are in hospital, and awareness and education campaigns on childhood cancer.

The Independent on Saturday

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