Durban snake catcher, Nick Evans up a tree in Parlock, Newlands on Friday where he removed a 1.6 metre long boomslang.

DURBAN - Durban snake catcher, Nick Evans had a tricky time catching a boomslang up a tree in Parlock, Newlands on Friday. 

Evans said while he had to get the 1.6 metre snake down and out of the branches, boomslang snake bites are rare as the slithery reptile prefers to stay hidden in trees. A young male boomslang is easily identified by bright emerald green eyes and although pale brown in colour, will change to green once it grows to over one metre long. 

According to Evans, although a boomslang’s venom is the most toxic of any snake when it comes to drop for drop venom, it is very slow acting and it can take up to 12 hours for symptoms to show - giving a bite victim plenty of time to seek treatment. 

Durban snake catcher, Nick Evans up a tree in Parlock, Newlands on Friday where he removed a 1,6 metre long boomslang
Durban snake catcher, Nick Evans up a tree in Parlock, Newlands on Friday where he removed a 1.6 metre long boomslang.

“A mamba bite is far more dangerous,” said Evans, having had to take on a pair of fighting black mambas earlier this week. 

He said that with the mamba mating season nearly over, call-outs for mambas have been slowing down, but with Durban’s warm winter temperatures this week, spitting snakes may well be spotted out and about soon. 

“Already the night adders are coming out as the toads have started waking up. We’ve had unusually warm weather and spring is just around the corner,” said Evans, adding that “spitters” such as cobras will also soon be waking up from their winter slumber.

Independent on Saturday