Kunstmann, who specialises in weddings and births, was contacted by Isabela’s parents to record the moment she entered the world. Picture: Max Pixel
Kunstmann, who specialises in weddings and births, was contacted by Isabela’s parents to record the moment she entered the world. Picture: Max Pixel

LOOK: Boss baby stares down doctors moments after birth

By Staff reporter Time of article published Mar 2, 2020

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It was a noteworthy moment. Luckily, photographer Rodrigo Kunstmann was on hand to capture the exact moment Isabela Pereira de Jesus stared down the doctors who delivered her at a hospital in Rio de Janeiro.

The meme-worthy expression went viral within a matter of moments after Kunstmann posted the image to Facebook. Kunstmann, who specialises in weddings and births, was contacted by Isabela’s parents to record the moment she entered the world.

Sharing the image to Facebook, he captioned the image: “Today is my birth and I don’t even have clothes for this.”

Speaking to Brazilian publication Crescer, he said: “She opened her eyes wide and didn't cry, she made a 'sulky' face, her mother gave a kiss and it was only after they cut the umbilical cord that she started to cry."

After Isabela’ birth via C-section, her mother said she didn't even notice her stare down. It was only after seeing the photo that she said "my daughter was born a ready meme.”

The Facebook post has already gained 2.8K shares and thousands of reactions.

But the funniest comments came from Facebook users who came up with alternative captions.

It's like "What the hell just happened"? commented one.

This is too cute...like she is saying, "Why did you take me out of here....I was so warm and comfy"! said another.

On other related news, parents may feel self-conscious doing it, but talking to a baby in a silly voice really could help them learn.

Children understand more proper words, such as banana and dog, when they are spoken in "parentese" – a slow, high-pitched, happy-sounding voice – a study has found.

Researchers taught parents of six-month-old babies about the importance of parentese.

Those who then used it more often said their children knew just over 99 words a year later. This dropped to 64 for babies of parents who weren’t coached and used less parentese.

Professor Patricia Kuhl, an author of the University of Washington study, said: "We now think parentese works because it’s a social hook for the baby brain – its high pitch and slower tempo are socially engaging and invite the baby to respond."

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