The Duchess of Sussex visiting NPO Mothers2Mothers in Cape Town. Picture: Henk Kruger/African News Agency (ANA)
Duchess Meghan donated some of her son Archie's old clothes to the Mothers2Mothers charity when she visited the non-profit on Wednesday.

The 38-year-old former actress spent time with women from the Mothers2Mothers organisation in Cape Town and before she left, she handed over a bag of garments previously worn by four-month-old Archie and some of her friends' children so they could be used again.

She said: "It's so important we're able to share what's worked for our family and know that we're all in this together with each other. So we wanted to share something from our home to each of yours."


The duchess showed off each piece to the group, including one vest bearing the slogan "The Future" and another with the Invictus Games logo.

She said: "Here's a few little things that I thought would be helpful.

"I just thought that, in the spirit of community, what's so nice is to be able to share some of the things we have at home as well.

"And so we can obviously make sure everything you need is provided for you, but we've brought some of the things that my friends and I used for our kids and Archie that don't fit anymore."

Meghan's meeting with the women from the organisation - which trains and employs women with HIV as frontline health workers - began with them sitting round in chairs, but the duchess quickly left her seat to sit on the floor, which was covered in toys, in order to make the gathered children feel more comfortable.

She said: "We should all sit down here. If it were Archie and we had all these toys in the middle, but I made him sit in the chair, it would be so unfair!"

Meghan spoke candidly to the group about being a working parent.

She said: "We're only five months in right now. Being a working mum and traveling as well with a baby, my goodness it's a lot, but it's all so exciting.

"There are days when it's a lot to juggle but then you meet someone and you have an impact on them and you say 'ah-ha,' and it's so rewarding."