The Failfix doll has come under fire from parents and social media users for asking children as young as six years old to ’fix her face’. Pictures: Amazon.com
The Failfix doll has come under fire from parents and social media users for asking children as young as six years old to ’fix her face’. Pictures: Amazon.com

Outrage over makeover toy: It’s sending harmful message to children, say parents

By Marchelle Abrahams Time of article published Nov 17, 2021

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Remember when toys were a simple pleasure we relished as children? No internet or smartphones to distract us from dressing up our dolls or racing our cars.

Now, with AI and the Internet of Things, toys have become a short-lived distraction until the new thing comes along.

The latest toy to hit the market has left parents across the globe shaking in disbelief.

The Failfix doll, available online at Amazon, has come under fire from parents and social media users for asking children as young as six years old to “fix her face”.

The doll comes packaged with messy hair, bad make-up and a dressing gown. Kids have to transform her and give her a complete makeover, from top to bottom.

The doll comes packaged with messy hair, bad make-up and a dressing gown.

“HELP! @PreppiPosh needs a #STYLESAVIOR! Take Over the Makeover and give her a total head-to-toe transformation,” the description says on Amazon’s website.

The doll, which was launched by Australian company Moose toys, has been accused of sending out the wrong message to young children, especially girls with body dysmorphic disorders.

Taking to Twitter, many concerned parents shared their views.

“Well that's something I can't unsee. Who the hell thought that was an okay idea? And how many focus groups did it get through?!,” commented one.

“For goodness sake, and what makes you even sadder is that there are people, especially mothers, that will buy this c**p. I wonder if any women were complicit in the terrible design of this… so disappointing,” said another.

In response to the outcry, a spokesperson for the toy company denied the doll suggested beauty and failure went hand in hand.

Speaking to the Daily Mail, it said: “Moose Toys most certainly do not create toys with a view to discriminate against or stereotype anyone.

“FailFix is all about the transformation of a failed makeover not a failed person.”

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