Kim Kardashian West goes to bed when her kids do. Picture: AP

Kim Kardashian West goes to bed when her kids do.

The 'Keeping Up With the Kardashians' star - who has North, six, Saint, three, Chicago, 22 months, and Psalm, six months, with husband Kanye West - "micromanages" her day and leads a conservative lifestyle in order to be at her best.

Speaking on Australian breakfast show 'Sunrise', she said: "I go to bed when the kids go to bed. I don't drink, don't stay out late at night.

"I just micromanage my day. I know every day, I wake up at a specific time and I have my schedule is set in stone and I really don't like to veer off of that."

The 39-year-old beauty is currently studying to be a lawyer and admitted she sometimes worries she "can't handle" the workload.

She said: "It really is extremely time-consuming. There are times when I think I can't handle, but then I just take a minute to myself and refocus. There is no cutting corners."

Kim previously admitted she had to "think long and hard" about taking on her new career path and eventually made her decision after she received a "really good result" when she petitioned President Donald Trump to commute the life sentence of non-violent drug offender Alice Marie Johnson, which led to the First Step Act being passed.

She said: "I never in a million years thought we would get to the point of getting laws passed. That was really a turning point for me."

But Kim admitted she felt out of her depth in the discussions so decided to pursue her dream of studying law.

She said: "The White House called me to advise to help change the system of clemency. And I'm sitting in the Roosevelt Room with, like, a judge who had sentenced criminals and a lot of really powerful people and I just sat there, like, 'Oh s**t.' I need to know more.

"I would say what I had to say, about the human side and why this is so unfair. But I had attorneys with me who could back that up with all the facts of the case.

"It's never one person who gets things done; it's always a collective of people, and I've always known my role, but I just felt like I wanted to be able to fight for people who have paid their dues to society. I just felt like the system could be so different, and I wanted to fight to fix it, and if I knew more, I could do more."