File photo: Avoiding the topic is in no way protecting them, but instead it’s leaving them vulnerable and exposed to wrong information.

Johannesburg - If you can trust your child with a smartphone, then you should be able to talk to them about sex. 

Social media platforms such as WhatsApp and Facebook sometimes become a platform to distribute adult content. This content can be viewed by anyone, and this includes children. It’s very dangerous to give a child a phone that has internet access without having the courage to educate them about sex.

I believe that sex education should be incorporated into parents’ dialogues with their children when they feel that they have come of age. The reality is that it's a part of life; children will engage in this activity with or without guidance from their parents or guardians. It makes sense to prepare and protect our children rather than to let them go out and experiment based on the advice of their peers.

Once a child has access to a smartphone, which in most cases is meant for better communication with their parents and their own safety, there is no monitoring of the activities they get involved in. The internet is not regulated, which means that anyone can access pornographic material on the web, which has become a breeding ground for paedophiles and moral degenerates.

As Africans, we were not brought up in environments that encouraged sex talk between children and adults. But times are changing fast and we need to adapt to ensure the safety of our young ones. Avoiding the topic is in no way protecting them, but instead it’s leaving them vulnerable and exposed to wrong information.

The Star