What does the future hold for the drinks industry? Will things ever be the same as they were before or is it time to accept the changes and adapt? Picture: Supplied
What does the future hold for the drinks industry? Will things ever be the same as they were before or is it time to accept the changes and adapt? Picture: Supplied

5 trends that will transform the alcoholic beverage industry post lockdown

By Lutho Pasiya Time of article published May 27, 2020

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As we are on lockdown, bars are closed and restaurants are open for delivery only at this stage, and friends and families are unable to gather.

These unprecedented times have forced us to find new ways to communicate, while bars and restaurants also have had to find innovative ways to operate post lockdown.  

But what does the future hold for the drinks industry? Will things ever be the same as they were before or is it time to accept the changes and adapt?

We spoke with noted mixologist Haroon Hafajee about trends that he thinks will transform the alcoholic beverage industry post lockdown and below is what he said. 

Haroon Haffajee. Picture: Supplied

A rise in alcohol consumption at home 

As regulations ease, bars and restaurants will be the last to fully open so consumers will have no choice but to purchase drinks for home consumption. 

A decrease in consumption overall 

I believe people will realise that they can survive without having to drink so often or so much with some realising that they have a problem and then being forced to solve the problem.  

Increase in beer and wine consumption as opposed to spirits 

Beer and wine are “easier” to consume as you do not need ice, mixers, etc. – this convenience along with people associating spirits with going out to bars and restaurants in social situations will lead to a change in what people drink.

What does the future hold for the drinks industry? Will things ever be the same as they were before or is it time to accept the changes and adapt? Picture: Supplied

Increase in low alcohol or no alcohol drinks

Linked to point two and three above, the omission of the social part of drinking will see people “needing” to get less intoxicated.

A decrease in binge drinking 

Reduced supply and access will mean that people are more careful of how much and how fast they drink – being forced to plan consumption ahead of time will mean consumers will think about it with a clear head and impulsive buying will be reduced or eliminated. 

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