“Bulletproof coffee” as many would call it, is said to boost your energy and help you lose weight, but is it healthy or just another trend driven by false claims? Picture: Supplied
“Bulletproof coffee” as many would call it, is said to boost your energy and help you lose weight, but is it healthy or just another trend driven by false claims? Picture: Supplied

Should we be drinking butter in our coffee?

By Lutho Pasiya Time of article published Jan 20, 2020

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In recent years, butter found its way into coffee cups. 

“Bulletproof coffee”, as it well known, is said to boost your energy and help you lose weight, but is it healthy or just another trend driven by false claims?

We spoke to an international health expert, Maria Ascencao about the trend. 

Ascencao said butter in coffee is a popular drink that contains coffee, butter and medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) or coconut oil consumed in place of breakfast, and that it’s said to boost your metabolism and energy levels, but these effects have yet to be clinically proven.

“Although I am a fan of US health expert, Dave Asprey’s “Bulletproof” coffee which is a type of pesticide-free coffee, a liquid high in MCTs and grass-fed, unsalted butter, not all of us have access to this special, organic blend. The DIY version of this coffee, butter coffee, may contain small amounts of calcium, vitamins K, E, and B vitamins but it is not considered a good source of these nutrients, and it contains a high amount of saturated fats which studies have found may be linked to increased risk of heart disease and stroke,” she said. 

“Bulletproof coffee” as many would call it, is said to boost your energy and help you lose weight, but is it healthy or just another trend driven by false claims? Picture: Supplied

Ascencao said although many people claim butter coffee provides lasting energy without the blood sugar crash, boosts mental clarity and supports fat loss, it has not been clinically proven and she recommends consulting with a healthcare professional first. 

“While it may be filling and energy-boosting, butter coffee comes with several downsides, including reduced nutrient intake, increased cholesterol and high levels of saturated fat which may be harmful to someone with elevated cholesterol levels or follows a low carb diet.

The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends limiting saturated fat to about 13 grams per day, while one cup of butter coffee contains about 14 grams,” she said. 

“I recommend a breakfast meal that contains fibre, good quality fats and a small amount of protein to help regulate blood sugar levels and nourish the body. A healthy smoothie, green juice or salad with avocado, lemon juice, egg, or grilled fish is a great example of a good wholesome breakfast. Always start the day with a warm glass of water with lemon to give your digestive system a healthy boost before breakfast,” added Ascencao. 

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