According to The Kitchen Project, a Butchermeister in Frankfurt, Germany gets credit for this unusual kind of fine ground pink coloured thin sausage that was not accepted well in Germany, so he went to Vienna, Austria. Picture: Reuters
According to The Kitchen Project, a Butchermeister in Frankfurt, Germany gets credit for this unusual kind of fine ground pink coloured thin sausage that was not accepted well in Germany, so he went to Vienna, Austria. Picture: Reuters

International Hot Dog Day: Nothing slaps like a hot dog

By Lutho Pasiya Time of article published Jul 22, 2020

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Admit it, hot dogs are good. Searching for complex recipes is fun and all, but there is something about a simple hot dog that hits the spot every time.

You can keep a hot dog basic with mustard and tomato sauce or get fancy with many toppings like cheese, chilli, and relish. The lip-smackingly delicious meal has been one of the most favourite quick and easy snacks forever.

In honour of International Hot Dog Day which is usually celebrated on the third Wednesday of July every year, we look at the history of this much-loved sandwich.

How did a sausage get to be a dog?

According to The Kitchen Project, a Butchermeister in Frankfurt, Germany gets credit for this unusual kind of fine ground pink coloured thin sausage that was not accepted well in Germany, so he went to Vienna, Austria.

They mention that when they became more and more popular, Frankfurt wanted it back and that they wanted to copyright the name Frankfurters. They also mention that Vienna is spelled and pronounced Wein in Austria, so they were also called Wieners.

Is the hot dog really made with mystery meat?

According to the site, in America, all food producers are required to reasonably list the ingredients that went into the manufacture of their meal without giving away their recipe. They say that an urban legend that they use all kinds of strange meats or by-products in their hot dogs and just add flavouring is not true.

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