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5 types of sausage all home cooks should know

Sausage is among the oldest world’s meat dishes, and its varieties range widely. Picture: Mali Maeder/Pexels

Sausage is among the oldest world’s meat dishes, and its varieties range widely. Picture: Mali Maeder/Pexels

Published May 6, 2022

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Sausage is among the oldest world’s meat dishes, and its varieties range widely.

Here in South Africa, we eat a variety of cuisines that incorporate all kinds of sausages.

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What is a sausage?

Well, in the simplest terms, it is meat that has been seasoned and stuffed into natural or artificial casings.

The word “sausage” comes from the Latin word “salsus”, which means salted. Here are some of the types of sausage you are likely to encounter at the butcher or shops, that you should have in your fridge as a cook.

Kielbasa

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Kielbasa is a polish smoked sausage easily recognisable because of its U shape.

Chunkier, meatier, thicker, and longer than other sausages, kielbasa is typically made of pork (sometimes with beef) and is often loaded with garlic.

Its savoury, slightly spicy flavour is best balanced with sauerkraut and mustard.

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Lorne

The Lorne sausage is a variety of pork and beef, the origins of which are not entirely known.

What makes this sausage different from other varieties is that it has no casing and is made as a square.

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A Lorne sausage is made from a combination of minced pork and beef, mixed with rusk and spices.

Saveloy

In isiXhosa we call this type of sausage “unqiyoyo”. This is a sausage from England that contains finely ground pork and sometimes beef, and is bright red or pink in colour. Saveloy sausages are a favourite at many fish and chip shops.

They are heavily spiced and seasoned, and are usually cooked by boiling or grilling them. And yes, you can eat the skin of a saveloy.

Chorizo

Chorizo is a highly seasoned chopped or ground pork sausage, used in Spanish and Mexican cuisine.

Mexican chorizo is made with fresh (raw, uncooked) pork, while the Spanish version is usually smoked.

Most often sold in casings, chorizo is generally removed from them and cooked prior to use. Simply sauté it as you would ground beef, and use it in enchiladas, tacos, burritos, soups, or stews.

Breakfast sausages

Widely popular in many parts of the world, breakfast sausages are made of pork and are typically sold raw.

They are traditionally made with unused pork parts (which farmers don't want to go to waste).

These mellow, sweet-salty links are mixed with a variety of spices and are enjoyed thoroughly cooked.

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