Gwyneth Paltrow was on Thursday accused by the head of the NHS of promoting "dodgy" health fads that put the public at risk. Picture: AP
Gwyneth Paltrow was on Thursday accused by the head of the NHS of promoting "dodgy" health fads that put the public at risk. Picture: AP

Gwyneth Paltrow accused of peddling fake news with her Goop brand

By BEN SPENCER Time of article published Jan 31, 2020

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London - Gwyneth Paltrow was on Thursday accused by the head of the NHS of promoting "dodgy" health fads that put the public at risk.

Sir Simon Stevens singled out the Hollywood star and her firm Goop for popularising "dubious" remedies such as "psychic vampire repellent".

Speaking at Oxford University, the NHS England chief executive took aim at "quacks, charlatans and cranks" who exploit health concerns.

He said social media makes it easier than ever for unproven "too-good-to-be-true" remedies to be sold and misinformation about vaccines spread. 

This fake news has been put "on steroids" by the "wellness" industry, he warned. And he singled out mother-of-two Paltrow, 47, as a prime example. 

Sir Simon, speaking in An Oxford Conversation at the Sheldonian Theatre, said: "Fresh from controversies over jade eggs and unusually scented candles, Goop has just popped up with a new TV series, in which Gwyneth Paltrow and her team test vampire facials and back a 'bodyworker' who claims to cure both acute psychological trauma and side-effects by simply moving his hands two inches above a customer’s body.

"Gwyneth Paltrow’s brand peddles 'psychic vampire repellent' – 27 US dollars – says 'chemical sunscreen is a bad idea', and promotes colonic irrigation and DIY coffee enema machines – despite them carrying considerable risks to health and NHS advice clearly stating there is 'no scientific evidence to suggest there are any health benefits associated with colonic irrigation'.

"While fake news used to travel by word of mouth – and later the Caxton press – we all know that lies and misinformation can now be round the world at the touch of a button, before the truth has reached for its socks, never mind got its boots on.

"Myths and misinformation have been put on steroids by the availability of misleading claims online. While the term 'fake news' makes most people think of politics, people’s natural concern for their health, and particularly about that of their loved ones, makes this particularly fertile ground for quacks, charlatans and cranks."

Sir Simon’s comments come after he launched an attack on the homeopathy industry in October for peddling deadly antivaccine myths.

HER ‘CURES’

BEE THERAPY

Paltrow once claimed she had been stung on purpose to cleanse the skin. "Apitherapy" is an ancient practice. But in 2018 a Spanish patient aged 55 died after she developed a severe reaction.

STONE EGGS

Said to strengthen the vagina. Paltrow claimed it was a "strictly guarded secret of Chinese royalty". But all mention of the eggs was removed from Goop’s website after a study debunked her claims.

COLONIC IRRIGATION

Goop endorsed the treatment, which can involve injecting 15 gallons of water through a tube into the rectum. It acknowledged this was "not recommended for everyone".

EIGHT DAYS OF GOAT’S MILK

The site featured a Q&A with a "naturopathic physician" who recommended drinking unpasteurised goat’s milk for eight days straight, despite reports suggesting it can cause parasitic infections.

INTIMATE STEAMING

Paltrow’s company praised "V-Steams", which supposedly use a combination of infrared light and mugwort plants to clean the uterus and vaginal area.

Daily Mail

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