Independent school operator Curro Holdings is using its 3D printers to print protective face shields. Picture: Supplied
Independent school operator Curro Holdings is using its 3D printers to print protective face shields. Picture: Supplied

SA school to produce 3D face shields for medical workers

By Viwe Ndongeni-Ntlebi Time of article published Apr 1, 2020

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South African private school group Curro aims to use 3D printers at its schools to produce protective face shields for use by medical workers treating Covid-19 patients.

In a statement, Curro announced that it would offer the use of their 3D printers to aid in the printing of protective face shields for medical workers in the front-line of the fight against Covid-19.

Face masks are a key part of protecting front line medical workers from contracting coronavirus, but wearing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for an extended period of time can be very uncomfortable for the wearer.

With the rapidly increasing number of infected people in South Africa, a mask has been a essential part of preventing the spread for many health workers.  

The Curro schools group said has applied to the Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC) for an essential services permit to start with production during the national lockdown. 

The group is in the process of rallying partners to assist with the supply of appropriate materials for the printing to take effect.

Curro CEO Andries Greyling said, “as a country, we’re all in this together; and so we feel it is our duty as Corporate SA and teachers of the next generation to lead by our example and take a bold stand to help where we can.”

Adding that the group is in the process of rallying partners to assist with the supply of appropriate materials for the printing.

3D mask are been created globally, as covid-19 infected number continue to increase. 

In China, a technology veteran and a 3D-printing “savant” have teamed with other members of industry, health care and government to launch Maker Mask, a Seattle nonprofit creating medically endorsed, reusable protective masks using everyday 3D printers.

In the UK, about 1 400 3D-printer owners have pledged to use their machines to help make face shields for the NHS.
 

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