Its unmistakable influence is hard to ignore, and millennials are embracing it like a warm hug in the dark. Picture: Vimeo

Love it or hate it, millennial pink is the colour of the season, and by the looks of it, here to stay, writes Marchelle Abrahams.

A subtle variation of salmon pink, millennial pink is the shade of 2017.

Trend forecasters have been chomping at the bit, predicting that the lighter shade of bright pink would soon start dominating all factors of popular culture.

From decor to fashion, its unmistakable influence is hard to ignore, and millennials are embracing it like a warm hug in the dark.

There’s just one problem: no one can agree on the actual colour…
A cross between nude and skin colour, the jury is still out on the number of shades that actually make up millennial pink.

Why is it so popular?

Alana van der Merwe, brand marketing expert with RED Marketing, suggests that the colour is no longer associated with femininity. Instead, it has become the colour mascot for androgynous and gender-neutral fashion trends.

“Fashion has often been used as a medium to challenge societal views and ideas, then setting the standards for other industries including beauty, decor and lifestyle,” she notes.

But she also points out one very clear reason for its popularity: “It’s aesthetically pleasing, symbolic and just plain cute!”

How did it start?

The lines are blurred when it comes to its origins, but some argue that it all started with the release of 2014 movie The Great Budapest Hotel which was an ode of sorts to retro kitsch and a building painted several shades of pink.

Rihanna’s Fenty Beauty range is all about pink. Picture: Instagram screengrab

And then Pantone named rose quartz one of its colours of 2016. Pair that with pale dogwood, the trending colour for spring 2017, and what do you get?

NY Mag’s Véronique Hyland described it perfectly when saying: “Pink used to be Malibu Barbie and Bubble Yum. That specific shade of pink is not the one that’s resurfaced. Instead it’s ironic pink, pink without the sugary prettiness.”

What’s trending

Japanese fashion and beauty brand MINISO, which just opened a store in Menlyn Park Shopping Centre, is just one example of how retailers have taken up with the trend. Headphones, notebooks, and even stationary have been given the millennial pink treatment.

Elle Magazine’s Faran Krentcil, during her recap of New York Fashion Week, noted that the trend is far more than a colour - it has become a movement. And NYFW featured designers were happy to jump onboard.

Headphones, notebooks, and even stationary have been given the millennial pink treatment. Picture: Supplied

Helmut Lang, Victoria Beckham and Anna Sui all tinted their catwalk models in some altered forms of the shade.

Pop star Rihanna is one avid fan and embraced it before it became fashionable. Now she’s taken her love for all things pink and even modelled her new Fenty Beauty range on it, showcasing lipsticks and blusher in nudes and soft pinks.

Even kitchenware has been tickled pink.

French cookware manufacturer Le Creuset has gone as far as releasing a range of millennial pink products, including their bestseller Cast-Iron Heart-Shaped Dutch Oven.

SMEG 50's Style Pastel Pink Retro Kettle

Want a tea kettle in Millennial Pink? Don’t worry, SMEG has you covered. What about a mixer? KitchenAid’s thought about that too.

How about incorporating it into your decor without going into overkill? 

Mr Price Home suggests a subtle approach by painting a feature wall and incorporating vintage elements with copper lighting.