Robert Pattinson. Picture: AP Photo/Markus Schreiber

Robert Pattinson - who had an on/off relationship with his 'Twilight Saga' co-star Kristen Stewart and recently split from his fiancée FKA Twigs - says love can be complicated.

The 31-year-old actor admitted he does not share the idealistic views on love that his character Samuel has in new movie 'Damsel'.

He said: "It's obviously more complicated. I think Samuel, the main character, is a bit of a fantasist. He likes believing in a poetic version of reality. I think life and love is a little more complicated than he perceives it."

Robert also went on to praise the Me Too movement as "pretty amazing", and revealed he is impressed with the Hollywood stars who have come together to fight sexual harassment within the movie industry and beyond.

He said: "If you feel that you've been wronged, and you feel that you don't have the right to tell people about it and you feel that you're being bullied into silence, it's one of the most awful things in the world. it's amazing when any kind of dam breaks and people feel they've got the numbers to say, no, you'll be safe to say whatever has happened to you. It's pretty amazing."

Robert's co-star Mia Wasikowska also shared her support for the movement.

She said: "The Respect Rally in Sundance was the first thing I've been able to go to and be a part of it and that was really amazing to feel the energy there and the connectedness of the people. I think it's great and I think it's going to be really significant change."

Meanwhile, Robert revealed that his performance in new movie 'Damsel', directed by David Zellner and Nathan Zellner, was inspired by Warren Beatty in Robert Altman's 1971 movie 'McCabe & Mrs. Miller'. 

Speaking at a press conference at the Berlin International Film Festival, he told Variety: "I don't even know how you describe Warren Beatty's character in that. There was just a kind of jauntiness to him that I liked. I always like parts where all of their actions - you should really be judging them as if they're doing something wrong but you have to play it kind of opposite, so as an audience member you sort of become complicit."