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How to make your perfume last longer in winter

You have to change the way you use your perfume in winter. Picture: Pexels

You have to change the way you use your perfume in winter. Picture: Pexels

Published Apr 16, 2022

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While we are still enjoying a few sunny days, there’s a definite chill in the air. A sure sign that autumn is setting in and winter is steadily approaching.

With a change in season, we are forced to make a few changes to our wardrobe – bring out the boots and coats – as well as our skincare.

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Yes, just as you’ve perfected your skincare routine and your skin is glowing, along comes winter.

The summer heat naturally provides the skin with warmth resulting in a rosy, dewy glow, especially if you’ve spent a day out on the beach, but during winter we tend to stay indoors, barely seeing the sun as we try to escape the chill.

As you change your beauty products to give your skin the extra help it needs during the harsh weather, you might want to consider changing how you use your perfume.

Because your skin is obviously colder in winter, you cannot rely on your body heat to enhance and prolong the scent of your perfume.

Perfume can be pricey, therefore you don’t want to have to reapply your perfume all day.

Here’s how you can make your perfume last longer during the chilly days ahead.

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In the same way that you layer your clothes in winter, you should try doing the same with your perfume. Many perfumes are available in a range of additional products. Choose a body lotion or moisturiser that matches your perfume, even if you just apply the lotion to certain areas of the body.

The fact that we cover up so much of our skin in winter means that the areas where we ordinarily apply perfume in summer are most likely covered in bulky clothes. While layering your perfume with different formats, applying it to bits of skin that most likely be exposed is your best bet. Your best spots would be the back of your ears and your wrists. If you’re feeling generous, spritz a small amount into your hair.

Not much of your skin shows in winter. Picture: Pexels

If you still feel that your perfume scent is too subtle, you could spray your clothing. Note this is only if your perfume is light and generally fades quickly. Whether it’s summer or winter, there’s nothing worse than overpowering perfume. So just a few squirts will do. Some perfumes, especially oil-based, can stain your garments, so be careful which fabric you use it on. If you wear any thermal undergarments, spray those as they sit closest to your skin.

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Applying perfume to your outer garments like a coat or jacket is great, especially since it’s not an item you wash with every wear.

While we all have our favourite perfumes, it is a good idea to have a different fragrance for the colder seasons. In the same way as you would wear a different perfume day and night. In summer we tend to opt for light, fresh and floral fragrances. With your body heat in summer these light perfumes are able to last long but will not hold up in winter when your body is cold. In winter, look out for perfumes with more warm, woody and earthy fragrances. Scents like sandalwood, patchouli, vanilla and musk tones are great for winter perfumes. When buying a new winter perfume opt for the eau de parfum version of the fragrance. Eau de toilette is lighter and doesn’t have the intensity and fades faster.

Change your perfume in winter. Picture: Pexels

Now, this might sound a bit cheap, but those little sample perfume bottles can really go a long way. Most stores have sample perfumes of the one you already own. Don’t be shy to ask an assistant for a sample. Keep it in your handbag for the occasional spritz.

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This article first appeared in Saturday Insider, April 16, 2022

Related Topics:

AdviceSelf-CareInsider

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