Brenda Mhlongo and Dr Brian Monaisa at the Smile Artists Africa event. Picture: Supplied.
Brenda Mhlongo and Dr Brian Monaisa at the Smile Artists Africa event. Picture: Supplied.

Smile Artists Africa raises over R1-million for breast cancer survivors

By Thobile Mazibuko Time of article published Oct 4, 2021

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Smile Artists Africa, a non-profit organisation founded by Dr Brian Monaisa and Azael Langa, has raised over R1-million at the Fusion Art Fashion event recently held at Kyalami Racetrack.

The event was in support of raising money for the funding of reconstructive breast surgeries of women affected by breast cancer. Last year, they managed to raise over R300 000 for three breast cancer survivors who were assisted with reconstructive breast surgery.

Mutangwa Machaba, one of the beneficiaries from last year’s fund-raiser, spoke about her healing journey after her breast reconstruction surgery.

“I would not have started healing spiritually and mentally had I not healed physically. To have my breast back together was one of the best things that ever happened to me. It made me think better about myself,” said Mutangwa.

Smile Artists Africa raises money by selling art pieces of well-known artists such as Phumzile Buthelezi, Percy Maimela, Treatwell Mnisi and Mel Madiba, to name a few. They also host fashion shows to sell opulent garments from selected designers.

This year, they partnered with Sanlam, Tecno, Porche and LE’VIN Wine. Art fanatics, fashion designers, the media and celebrities, including Unathi Nkayi, Katlego Danke, Robert Marawa, Melanie Bala and Brenda Mhlongo, were some of the guests at the second Fusion Art Fashion event.

Smile Artists Africa raises money by selling art pieces of well-known artists such as Phumzile Buthelezi, Percy Maimela, Treatwell Mnisi and Mel Madiba, to name a few. Picture: Supplied

Dr Monaisa thanked artists and fashion designers who offered their artistic skills to raise funds for breast cancer survivors.

“We are grateful to the supporters of our vision, which is to give breast cancer survivors a second chance at life,” he said.

He added that there was a growing need for such an intervention as breast cancer was becoming more aggressive.

“Breast cancer is the second common cause of death in South Africa. Breast cancer patients are becoming younger and younger by the day, and breast cancer reconstruction is not paid for by medical aids,” he explained.

Dr Monaisa advises women to check their breasts regularly for potential signs of breast cancer.

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