Socialite Bonang Matheba at the Vodacom Durban July, The race was currently underway at the Greyville race course under the theme Stars of Africa. Picture: Motshwari Mofokeng/African News Agency (ANA)
Socialite Bonang Matheba at the Vodacom Durban July, The race was currently underway at the Greyville race course under the theme Stars of Africa. Picture: Motshwari Mofokeng/African News Agency (ANA)

2020 VDJ theme sets fashionistas' hearts aflutter

By Mercury Reporter Time of article published Feb 19, 2020

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Durban - Socialites and fashion lovers eager for the 2020 Vodacom Durban July on Saturday 4 July can look forward to a creative metamorphosis following the announcement of the “Butterflies” theme for the raceday.

The announcement of the theme, that governs the fashion, décor and social look-and-feel of the event, has become the traditional kick-start to the build-up to Africa’s Greatest Horseracing Event.

“There was one thing that really stood out for me at the 2019 Vodacom Durban July and that was the predominance of brightly coloured outfits inspired by the Stars of Africa theme and I wanted to encourage more of that aspect for the 2020 event,” said Ken Tweddell, Gold Circle’s Event Marketing Manager, responsible for coming up with the theme for the Vodacom Durban July each year.

“The hunt for an idea began, and unusually it happened a day or two after the raceday,” he said.

“Every year we host a team of international media at the event and in true South African style we like to show them the wild side of South Africa before they head back home,” said Tweddell.

“We were taking the journalists on a game drive and I was a bit early at the meeting point. To pass the time I was browsing a selection of books on wildlife that were at the reception desk and the brightest and most colourful book on the shelf was Butterflies of South Africa. The penny dropped!”

“Butterflies of excitement in the stomach for the racing folk. The social butterflies of the fashion stakes. The variety of bright colours and patterns of butterflies”, explained Tweddell. “The theme was born!”


The Mercury

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