DA leader Mmusi Maimane
Durban - DA leader Mmusi Maimane kept his promise and returned to the Christian Revival Centre Church in Chats­worth on Sunday to deliver a sermon, calling on people to work together for a better South Africa for the youth.

Maimane called on the congregation to focus on the future of the country and that of the youth. “We must focus on nothing else but tomorrow. We must focus on our young people getting jobs tomorrow. We must do whatever we can, with all that we have to impact the next generation,” he said.

Maimane said education and employment were the main aspects in safeguarding the future, adding that corruption was stealing from the youth.

“We must show them a picture of a South Africa for all. We must show them a vision that says it is possible that one day our young people will get work, that one day the education of our children will be one that makes them compete with anyone in the world.”

Maimane said it was no longer South African children competing only with each other. “They are competing for a job with someone in China and America because that is where things are getting made.”

Maimane, who was a preacher at Discovery Church in Randburg, first visited the Chatsworth church in May to attend the funeral of Sadia Sukhraj, 9, killed during an alleged botched hijacking in Shallcross.

Relating stories from the Bible, Maimane said the country needed new leadership to “take us to the promised land”.

On the back of EFF leader Julius Malema accusing the majority of Indians of being racist during a Youth Day speech in the North West, Maimane said there was no room for racism in South Africa - he believed everyone was made in the image of God so skin colour didn’t matter.

He disapproved of leaders who incited division, saying they lacked a vision for the future and held on to past atrocities. “You are not going to heal a nation if your inspiration is hatred.”

Maimane was accompanied by deputy provincial leader Mergan Chetty and was given a leather-bound Bible by church founder Pastor Paul Lutchman.

The Mercury