Umgeni Water said it had sufficient resources to meet demand in the municipalities it supplied and imposing water restrictions would not be required. File Picture.
DURBAN - Umgeni Water said it had sufficient resources to meet demand in the municipalities it supplied and imposing water restrictions would not be required.

This was decided at the meeting of the Mgeni System Joint Operations Committee (JOC) last week.

However the water utility warned that consumers should continue to use water sparingly to ensure that restrictions did not have to be implemented.

The JOC comprises eThekwini metro, Msunduzi Local Municipality, and uMgungundlovu and Ugu District municipalities.

The committee consists of the departments of Water and Sanitation, Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs KwaZulu-Natal, and the KZN agricultural sector.

Umgeni Water spokesperson Shami Harichunder said the decision of the JOC to ask the Ministry of Water and Sanitation not to implement water restrictions was informed by the outcomes of hydrological models.

Harichunder said the models, which were run at various dam catchments in the Mgeni System during May, point to total current water resources in this system and projections of short-term demands.

“Factors that are considered when these models are run are projections of future rainfall, and projections of whether current/existing water resources are able to meet the full demands of the four municipalities that are supplied from the Mgeni System,” he said.

Analysis done in the May hydrological modelling, said Harichunder, showed that the Mgeni System was able to meet the full requirements of the four municipalities if there were no sharp or significant increases in demand.

He said that there was a 5% risk of level one water restrictions, according to the hydrological modelling.

“It is, therefore, imperative that no mammoth spikes occur in demand.

“In order to prevent this occurring, consumers need to continue using water sparingly,” he said, emphasising that water conservation and demand management were still required so that the amount of water available would last until the next good rains fell.

“The total storage system in the Mgeni System has to be at 69% or more to prevent the application of water restrictions. Current total storage in this system, as at May 13, was 74.4%,” he said.

He added that although the “water adequacy” was in a healthy state, there was a 5% decrease from last year.

THE MERCURY