Construction workers at a house on the Bluff have discovered bones buried at the property that could be at least 200 years old.
Construction workers at a house on the Bluff have discovered bones buried at the property that could be at least 200 years old.
Construction workers at a house on the Bluff have discovered bones buried at the property that could be at least 200 years old.
Construction workers at a house on the Bluff have discovered bones buried at the property that could be at least 200 years old.
Construction workers at a house on the Bluff have discovered bones buried at the property that could be at least 200 years old.
Construction workers at a house on the Bluff have discovered bones buried at the property that could be at least 200 years old.
Construction workers at a house on the Bluff have discovered bones buried at the property that could be at least 200 years old.
Construction workers at a house on the Bluff have discovered bones buried at the property that could be at least 200 years old.
Construction workers at a house on the Bluff have discovered bones buried at the property that could be at least 200 years old.
Construction workers at a house on the Bluff have discovered bones buried at the property that could be at least 200 years old.
Durban - Construction workers at a property on the Bluff may have discovered the skeletal remains of someone who had been buried at the site for more than 200 years.

On Tuesday, the men began digging and unearthed the bones.

KwaZulu-Natal police spokesperson Captain Nqobile Gwala said the remains were found buried at the property in Serowe Road.

“The men had been digging a trench about one-and-a-half metres deep. Police officers from the SAPS Search and Rescue Team were called out,” she said.

Gwala said an inquest had been opened at the Brighton Beach police station.

A well-placed source said the scene was cordoned off.

“The workers were told to wait as teams from the SAPS Forensic Laboratory and Provincial Heritage Conservation Agency (Amafa) were heading out to inspect the bones,” the source said.

Amafa’s Ros Devereux said an archaeological team visited the Bluff property yesterday.

“The remains were excavated. Our team suspects that this could be an old grave site. All traditional graves which are unmarked fall under the Provincial Heritage Act. They will still investigate how old the bones are. These could be hundreds, if not thousands of years old,” Devereux said.

She said if they were thousands of years old, relatives may not be traced.

Devereux said the Bluff had a very interesting history.

“Stone age people would often go to the beach in search of shellfish. They would then camp and live on the beach,” she said.

The Mercury