PIETERMARITZBURG residents were demanding basic services, such as a clean city without potholes, said Melanie Veness of the Pietermaritzburg Chamber of Business.  
Picture:  Motshwari Mofokeng  African News Agency (ANA)
PIETERMARITZBURG residents were demanding basic services, such as a clean city without potholes, said Melanie Veness of the Pietermaritzburg Chamber of Business. Picture: Motshwari Mofokeng African News Agency (ANA)

Potholes, rubbish and broken street lights mar Msunduzi

By Thami Magubane Time of article published Feb 14, 2020

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Durban - It has been 10 months since the Msunduzi Municipality was placed under administration, and service delivery still remains an issue.

Uncollected rubbish is piling up on streets, roads are littered with potholes, street lights are broken and buildings are not maintained.

Questions are now being raised as to whether service delivery will improve as the municipality looks in earnest to appoint a city manager, a post vacant since last year.

Candidates being touted for the position include former Msunduzi municipal manager Mxolisi Nkosi and Madoda Khathide, a former municipal manager in Ladysmith.

The Mercury visited the city this week and the sights were not pleasant. Coming off the N3, at the Chota Motala off-ramp, East Street was filthy.

There were close to 15 refuse bags lying on the side of the road. Boom and Langalibalele streets were also unclean. Alexandra Road, which is home to the KwaZulu-Natal premier, was also littered with rubbish bags, while at the intersection of Alexandra and Richmond roads, an illegal dump was burgeoning.

DA councillor Sibongiseni Majola said very little had changed in terms of service delivery.

“The main source of the problem is that our finances are not improving. We are spending more than we collect. There are only two trucks from waste collection that are functioning.

“About 70% of the street lights in the city are not working and almost every road is littered with potholes,” he said. He added that the absence of city law enforcement authorities heightened the problems.

The Msunduzi mayor, Mzimkhulu Thebolla, said he was not aware of problems with refuse collection but would investigate. He conceded they did not have enough trucks, but said the matter was being attended to.

In his view, the general condition of the city was improving.

He said they had a team dedicated to fixing potholes, and the city was in the process of reviewing its by-laws to deal with bad buildings and illegal businesses.

The Mercury

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