Motorist passing Mariannhill toll plaza, on their way home, after spending the holidays in KwaZulu - Natal. Picture: Bongani Mbatha/African News Agency (ANA)
Motorist passing Mariannhill toll plaza, on their way home, after spending the holidays in KwaZulu - Natal. Picture: Bongani Mbatha/African News Agency (ANA)

Toll tariffs set to increase next month

By Karen Singh Time of article published Feb 25, 2021

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DURBAN - Transport Minister Fikile Mbalula has made adjustments to the toll tariffs on national roads that will come into effect on March 1.

Mbalula approved the adjustments based on recommendations made by the SA National Roads Agency (Sanral) which were gazetted on February 11.

Sanral’s general communications manager Vusi Mona also clarified that the increase was 3.39% and not 5%, as had initially been stated on Sunday.

He said the table of the new toll fees was correct and stood as published.

A round trip from Durban to Pietermaritzburg on the N3 passing through the Mariannhill Plaza will cost R23, R46, R58 and R90 depending on the class of vehicle.

Motorists headed to King Shaka International Airport from Durban will have for fork out R13, R26, R40 and R54 for a round trip.

“The toll tariff amounts are adjusted by the annual consumer price index inflation rate and therefore remain the same in real terms and are effectively not increased above the base date toll tariff from when the toll was initially implemented,” said Mona.

Sanral said discounts offered at specific toll plazas for frequent users, as well as qualifying local users, still applied.

Applications for discounts could be made at toll plaza offices nationwide.

Sanrall said its toll road network represents 13.3% of the 22,253km Sanral national road network and only 5% of the total South African road network.

According to the agency, the tariff revenue was used by the Transport Department to implement major road infrastructure projects and to ensure seamless mobility of vehicles on the national road network.

“Toll roads allow for the borrowing of capital to develop road infrastructure when it is required, rather than having to wait until funds are available from an already strained fiscus. Toll monies are used to maintain, operate and improve toll roads, as well as to service debt incurred to implement a toll road project.”

For details on the applicable tariffs, please refer to the Government Gazettes published on Thursday 11 February 2021, numbers 44145, 44146, 44147 and 44149.

Available at the following link: https://archive.opengazettes.org.za/archive/ZA/2021/government-gazette-ZA-vol-668-no-44146-dated-2021-02-11.pdf

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The Mercury

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