Kripa Devar, teacher, author and founder of The Platform Reader organisation (centre) with the budding young school-going authors whose collection of short stories has been published in a book.     Zanele Zulu African News Agency (ANA)
Kripa Devar, teacher, author and founder of The Platform Reader organisation (centre) with the budding young school-going authors whose collection of short stories has been published in a book. Zanele Zulu African News Agency (ANA)

Young authors spread African magic in book

By Karen Singh Time of article published Mar 9, 2020

Share this article:

Durban - A first of its kind South African book titled Africa Where The Magic Is, a collection of short stories written by children between the ages of 6 and 16, was launched at Crawford College at the weekend.

The book project was spearheaded by The Platform Reader.

The organisation’s founder, Kripa Devar, a teacher and author, said its focus was to reach the children of Africa, to generate a culture of reading through storytelling and story writing.

“Our young writers expressed their stories with compelling logic, and through their innocence they have presented their own ideas on how humanity can live in peace and unity,” said Devar.

Devar said it was the first time in South Africa that such a creative project, called Project Giraffe, has been offered to children as a literacy programme.

“Many schools in Durban were eager to get involved and parents took the initiative to support their children,” she said.

Nimba Myeki, 11, who attends Morningside Primary School, said her story, Where Talent Lies, was about a girl from a small town who was trying to discover her hidden talent.

“She tries other people’s talents but eventually she learns that her talent is helping others,” said Nimba.

Nimba said the moral of the story was that everyone was unique.

Fourteen-year-old Kirsten Cottrell, who entered the writing contest while attending Winston Park Primary School last year, said the message that she wanted to convey in her story, The Sleeping Mountains of Long Ago, was that people always make mistakes but should be given a chance to correct them.

She said her story was set in the Drakensberg mountains and was based on people looking at the San paintings, and imagining their stories.

Megan Govender, 16, who attends Kloof High School, said the moral of her story, An African Enchantment, was that true magic in Africa lay within everyone.

“I think that we all have the power to be storytellers if we really try, and that if you really want to do something you should just go for it, because we can do anything that we put our minds to,” she said.

The Mercury

Share this article: