Jackson Make graduated with his Bachelor of Social Science degree from the University of KwaZulu-Natal yesterday.     Rogan Ward
Jackson Make graduated with his Bachelor of Social Science degree from the University of KwaZulu-Natal yesterday. Rogan Ward

Howzat! Blind cricketer scores degree

By Karen Singh Time of article published Apr 3, 2019

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DURBAN - Blind South African cricketer Jackson Make graduated with his BSc degree from the University of KwaZulu-Natal yesterday.

Commenting on his graduation, Make said: “This is one of my greatest achievements.”

Make said at the beginning of his degree, he struggled with mobility, but because he was a quick learner it took him only three weeks to become familiar with the campus.

He said another challenge was waiting for his textbooks to be converted into soft copy.

“One of the challenges that we face as blind people is that when we buy a book, it has to be sent to the disability unit, which can be found on each campus, for it to be converted into soft copy. That on its own takes time, possibly a couple of weeks.

“Sometimes we submit work late and lose marks because some lecturers don’t understand. However, most lecturers do.”

Make also said lecturers would sometimes not realise that they were teaching people with disabilities and that notes on a projector were of no use to them.

“After having meetings with our co-ordinator, we would go to the lecturers after the class to get the notes, which would be sent to the disability unit.”

Make was part of the South African squad that participated in the 40-Over Blind Cricket World Cup held in Cape Town in 2014. He also participated in the T20 Blind Cricket World Cup in India in 2012.

He was nominated by the KZN Cricket Union as the Blind Cricketer of the Year in 2014.

Blind cricket is played with a plastic ball with bearings inside that make a sound when played. The stumps are metal and make a clanging sound when hit.

“I am totally blind but I’m good at fielding and bowling. I rely totally on the sound of the ball,” he said.

Make, who attended a school for the blind in Free State, hopes to be an inspiration to other blind and partially-sighted students.

He plans to pursue postgraduate studies and wants to continue excelling in cricket.

THE MERCURY 

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