The body and most of the running gear was sourced unchanged from the original.
The body and most of the running gear was sourced unchanged from the original.
A large, heavy-looking electric motor is bolted straight on to the original differential and the rest of the engine compartment is taken up by two banks of batteries.
A large, heavy-looking electric motor is bolted straight on to the original differential and the rest of the engine compartment is taken up by two banks of batteries.
The interior has been updated with a new steering wheel,  revised centre console, GPS navigation and an iPhone dock.
The interior has been updated with a new steering wheel, revised centre console, GPS navigation and an iPhone dock.

If there's one car uniquely suited to conversion to alternative power (and we're using the term loosely here, you understand) it's that sci-fi cult car the DeLorean DMC-12.

Now the guys who bought the rights to the DeLorean name - and relocated it to Humble, Texas - have announced a battery-powered version of the DMC-12, which it says will go into production in 2013.

The prototype you see here (which is apparently a runner) was built in collaboration with Epic EV, an electric-vehicle company started by Aptera co-founder Chris Anthony, which is currently also working on two battery-powered projects code named simply Torq and Amp.

The DeLorean conversion is simplicity itself; the body and most of the running gear was sourced unchanged from the original V6 mid-engined model, with a large, heavy-looking electric motor bolted straight on to the original differential (which means it will go equally fast in either direction!) and the rest of the engine compartment taken up by two banks of remarkably low-tech batteries.

The interior has also been updated with a new steering wheel, revised centre console, GPS navigation and an iPhone dock.

Rumblings out of Humble say the production version will have 190kW and a top speed of 200km/h, and will cost about $100 0000 (R800 000) ex factory.