There's a strong Lamborghini influence clearly visible in Pavlo Burkatskyy's cab-forward, sharply-creased composite body.
There's a strong Lamborghini influence clearly visible in Pavlo Burkatskyy's cab-forward, sharply-creased composite body.
But from this end it looks like something Darth Vader would drive.
But from this end it looks like something Darth Vader would drive.
The cabin of the prototype is trimmed in leather and composites.
The cabin of the prototype is trimmed in leather and composites.

Lee Noble has been designing and building brutally fast supercars for nearly three decades, starting with the Ultima, a still-born South African project that produced only a few cars - one of which was used as a test mule in the development of the McLaren F1.

Then he started Noble Automotive, which produced a string of supercars culminating in the M600, a carbon-fibre rocketship with a 480kW, twin-turbo V8.

But now he's the driving force behind Arrinera, a Polish-British joint venture that, so far, has produced just one car - and you're looking at it.

There's a strong Lamborghini influence clearly visible in Pavlo Burkatskyy's cab-forward, sharply-creased composite body, with its scissor doors and dramatically-positioned air scoops, but the back end looks like something out of Star Wars, with diagonal LED tail lights and central exhausts.

Arrinera say they that if you ask nicely, they can make the body, interior and floor out of carbon fibre to reduce weight even further.

The chassis, however, is all Noble, fabricated from variable-section high-strength steel for maximum torsional rigidity; and mounted in the middle of it there's a 6.2-litre V8 for which Noble quotes 480kW and 820Nm.

That, he says, is good enough to slingshot the car from 0-100 in just 3.2 seconds, dispose of the standing quarter in eleven seconds dead and hit 340km/h flat out.

Noble's chassis features multilink suspension all round, rather than the classic double wishbones, providing enough lateral stability for the car to pull 1.3g in corners.

Braking is entrusted to 380mm front discs with six-pot callipers and 350mm rear platters with four-piston grippers, and the car runs on 19" forged alloys shod with 255/35 front and 335/30 rear rubber.

The cabin of the prototype is trimmed in leather and composites, with four-point harnesses and roll bars as standards issue.

Noble says it will take at least a year to develop the Arrinera for market; production vehicles will be built in Poland at about €115 000 (R1.2 million) each ex factory.