Quoted power from the naturally-aspirated two-litre boxer is up from 147 to 154kW.
Quoted power from the naturally-aspirated two-litre boxer is up from 147 to 154kW.
Now you can paddle your own Subaru.
Now you can paddle your own Subaru.

Sometimes the simplest way to do something is the old-fashioned way; Subaru SA has added 7kW to the power output of its BRZ coupé - sister car to the Toyota 86 and the brand's only rear-wheel drive model - by the time-honoured expedient of making the optional "performance" exhaust a standard fitting.

Nobody's making any secret that the (barely) street-legal free-flow kerzorst is also a good deal more authoritative - which will go down well among petrolheads everywhere.

Quoted power output form the naturally-aspirated two-litre flat four 'boxer' is up from 147 to 154kW at the same 7000 revs, with peak torque unchanged at 205Nm from 6400-6600rpm. Subaru doesn't mention straight-line performance gains - a tacit admission that any advantage in the Stoplight Grand Prix is more likely a result of the slick-shifting skill of the driver.

PADDLING YOUR OWN SUBARU

Talking of which, Subaru has also finally released a six-speed paddle-shift semi-auto version of the little two-door, for street-fighters who want to look good without having to work for it, at a price premium of R10 000.

Trim level is the same, including limited-slip differential, rear spoiler, 17" alloys, bi-xenon headlights, keyless access and starting, dual-zone climate control, seven airbags and five-mode vehicle dynamics control.

Whether you think seven kilowatts, a more authoritative soundtrack and a Southern Cross badge justify a R35 300 premium (R24 700 for the self-shifter) over the similarly-specced Toyota equivalent, is up to you.