Toyota’s CH-R was already one of the more striking compact crossovers on the market, so there’s no surprise that the midlife nip and tuck keeps things subtle, while also focusing on detailed refinements and cabin gadgetry, which seems to change direction faster than the wind these days.

The biggest point of difference on the outside is a redesigned bumper that now has a larger lower airdam, while the new headlights and taillights have a darker tint and incorporate updated LED technology.

Inside, Toyota has installed a new infotainment system, which now offers full smartphone integration, while also supporting the latest versions of Apple CarPlay and Android Auto.

As far as under-the-skin changes go, engineers have upgraded the NVH (noise, vibration and harshness) suppressing package, while also modifying the steering for improved feel.

On the powertrain front, European customers get a new range-topping hybrid powertrain option, mating a 2-litre normally aspirated petrol engine to an electric motor for a system output of 135kW. Toyota is also offering an improved version of its 1.8-litre hybrid drivetrain, as strict new pollution standards loom on that continent.

South African vehicles are currently powered by a 1.2-litre turbopetrol engine, and there is no word on whether any additional powerplants will be offered when the upgraded range docks here.

IOL Motoring