MACQUARIE PARK, AUSTRALIA - It all started when Hyundai’s Australian division posed a rather enticing question to its fans on a social media poll: which Hyundai should get the N treatment next?

The respondents actually chose the Tucson SUV, but Hyundai said that would simply be too easy, so they chose the second placed iMax MPV, which is sold as the H1 Bus in South Africa.

What the local division’s ‘underground skunkworks team’ came up with is far more than just a mildly tinkered bus with fancy wheels - what we have here is a tyre-shredding 300kW drifting bus that still seats eight people - so more can enjoy the sideways thrills. 

Sure, in the wrong hands and in the wrong place (namely public roads) this could simply be a way of endangering even more lives, but thankfully this is a one-off custom creation that’s not even classified as road legal. It will, however be competing in various drifting events in Australia.

So what’s it made of?

For starters, Hyundai threw out the standard 2.5-litre turbodiesel mill, replacing it with a 3.5-litre twin-turbo V6 that pushes “over 300kW of power and 555Nm of torque”. This is hooked up to a bi-modal exhaust that provides a soundtrack to do this vehicle justice. Against the clock, the drift bus will sprint from 0-100km/h in under five seconds, Hyundai says.

An eight-speed automatic gearbox and rear differential are in charge of channelling the torque to the back wheels, to get your sideways groove on at the circuit. This vehicle is also kitted out with 19-inch alloy wheels from the i30N as well as upgraded brakes and electronically-controlled dampers.

Watch it in action below:

The team also did some interior decorating in the form of an N performance division steering wheel and N sports front chairs, while all seats are upholstered in a combination of suede and leather.

Incidentally, this is not the first time that somebody at Hyundai dreamed up a souped up H1 bus - the original inspiration for this drifting machine actually came from one of Hyundai’s April Fool’s Day pranks, in which a rendering of an imaginary 'H1 N' was posted online.

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