Due to the fear of contracting Covid-19 in hospitals, patients in have been opting to self-medicate and some miss treatments such as dialysis sessions and cancer treatments, Kenyan local media reported. File picture: Courtney Africa/African News Agency (ANA)
Due to the fear of contracting Covid-19 in hospitals, patients in have been opting to self-medicate and some miss treatments such as dialysis sessions and cancer treatments, Kenyan local media reported. File picture: Courtney Africa/African News Agency (ANA)

Kenyans are urged to use remote consultation services instead of self-medicating

By ANA Reporter Time of article published May 18, 2020

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CAPE TOWN - Due to the fear of contracting Covid-19 in hospitals, patients have been opting to self-medicate and some miss treatments such as dialysis sessions and cancer treatments, Kenyan local media reported.

According to The Star, hospitals in Kenya have encouraged patients who are sceptical about physical visits to consider using remote consultation services such as Zoom, a video conferencing application to seek services.

Associate Dean, Clinical Affairs and Chief of Staff at Aga Khan University Hospital, Dr Majid Twahir, says that patients will continue to receive the quality care they need from their doctors via Zoom or phone but will need to visit the clinic to access the service.

Twahir says patient safety and welfare are prioritised, with hospitals implementing infection prevention measures. However, those who still feel wary should use remote consultation and triage services.

After triaging the patient will be advised on when to visit their doctor.

According to MedicineNet, a medical information website, triaging is the process of sorting people based on their need for immediate medical treatment as compared to their chance of benefiting from such care.

It is typically done in emergency rooms, disasters and wars, when limited medical resources must be allocated to maximise the number of survivors.

It has been reported that there has been a surge in the sales of over the counter medicines that can be bought without a doctor’s prescription. 

Painkillers, antacids, vitamins and cough remedies are some of the most commonly abused, The Star reported.

For those visiting clinics or hospitals measures such as screening at entry points to measure temperature and mandatory rules to wear masks have been implemented, Twahir told The Star.

"There are also dedicated housekeeping staff who are decontaminating and sterilising hospital areas and equipment continuously.

“We also encourage patients to sanitise or wash their hands regularly while in the hospital. Hand sanitisers have been placed strategically within hospitals," The Star quoted Twahir as saying.

He also encouraged people to maintain a physical distance of one to two metres to protect themselves and others.

The coronavirus has claimed 50 lives in Kenya, with 912 positive cases and 336 recoveries so far, according to Worldometer.

African News Agency 

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