Farmers in Namibia’s northern regions fear that the current dry spell could lead to a drought. Picture: Henk Kruger/African News Agency (ANA)
Farmers in Namibia’s northern regions fear that the current dry spell could lead to a drought. Picture: Henk Kruger/African News Agency (ANA)

Namibian farmers fear dry conditions could lead to drought

By Chad Williams Time of article published Jan 8, 2022

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Cape Town - Farmers in Namibia’s northern regions fear that the current dry spell could lead to a drought.

According to online news publication The Namibian, unexpected dry spells during seasons when rain is usually plentiful hurt the fortunes of farmers in the northern regions, especially those who depend on crop farming for survival and income generation.

Many crop farmers who ploughed their fields in early December and planted mahangu and maize seeds told The Namibian that their seeds never germinated because they never received any rain, according to local media.

Those whose seeds did germinate have seen their crops dry up due to no rainfall.

The country has suffered huge droughts during the last decade, causing the declaration of a national state of emergency on three different occasions since 2013 due to the water scarcity, according to local media.

A July 2021 Unesco report stated that flood frequency in the southern African country has increased in recent years, affecting around 70,000 people annually.

Many parts of Namibia are experiencing frequent drought occurrences as well as an increase in frequency of unpredictable flood and drought.

Namibia is one of the most vulnerable countries to the effects of climate change due to the aridity in most parts of the country, say climate experts.

Events resulting from climate changes such as droughts drive the majority of the population into poverty when they occur.

ANA

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