FILE – Sudan’s Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok has resigned amid a political deadlock and widespread protests following a military coup that derailed the country’s fragile transition to democracy. In this file photo, Hamdok speaks during a press conference in Khartoum on February 8, 2021. (Photo by ASHRAF SHAZLY / AFP)
FILE – Sudan’s Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok has resigned amid a political deadlock and widespread protests following a military coup that derailed the country’s fragile transition to democracy. In this file photo, Hamdok speaks during a press conference in Khartoum on February 8, 2021. (Photo by ASHRAF SHAZLY / AFP)

Sudan’s prime minister resigns after weeks of violent pro-democracy protests

By Chad Williams Time of article published Jan 3, 2022

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Cape Town – Sudan’s Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok has resigned amid a political deadlock and widespread protests following a military coup that derailed the country’s fragile transition to democracy, according to international media reports on Monday.

Hamdok announced his resignation in a televised address late on Sunday, only six weeks after he returned to his post in a deal with the coup leaders, broadcaster Al Jazeera reported.

Hamdok called for a dialogue to agree on a “national charter” and to “draw a roadmap” to complete the transition to democracy.

“I decided to return the responsibility and declare my resignation as the prime minister,” he said.

The Guardian quoted him as saying his stepping down would allow for another person to lead the nation and complete its transition to a “civilian, democratic country”.

A fresh wave of anti-coup protests flared up across Sudan in December as demonstrators continued to call for an end to the military rule established in early October.

Tens of thousands of Sudanese protesters rallied to mark three years since the start of mass demonstrations that led to the ousting of the dictator Omar al-Bashir as fears mounted for the country’s democratic transition.

Demonstrators marched to the presidential palace in Sudan’s capital Khartoum to reject the October 25 military takeover led by General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, drawing volleys of tear gas and stun grenades from security forces.

In his televised address, Hamdok said the country was at a "dangerous turning point that threatens its whole survival," the BBC reported.

More than 50 people have been killed at protests since the coup, including at least two on Sunday, according to the pro-democracy Sudan Central Doctors' Committee.

African News Agency (ANA)

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