The National Lotteries Commission has contributed R50 million to assist in efforts to cushion the impact of the Covid-19Photo: Raymond Joseph/GroundUp
The National Lotteries Commission has contributed R50 million to assist in efforts to cushion the impact of the Covid-19Photo: Raymond Joseph/GroundUp

Coronavirus: National Lotteries Commission pledges R50 million

By Staff Reporter Time of article published Mar 25, 2020

Share this article:

Durban - The National Lotteries Commission has contributed R50 million to assist in efforts to cushion the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on South Africans.

In a statement released earlier today, the NCL said the funds would be used to provide "much-needed relief" to beneficiaries of the Solidarity Fund.

On Monday President Cyril Ramaphosa declared a 21-day lock down period for South Africans to curb the spread of covid-19. 

Ramaphosa said government had set up an independent relief fund called the Solidarity Response Fund aimed to offer assistance to South Africans affected by the outbreak.

The fund is independently administered and South African businesses, organisations and  individuals, as well as members of the international community can contribute to it.

"Since then, the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition, Ebrahim Patel, has in consultation with the National Lotteries Commission board made the request in line with the Lotteries Act of 1997," said Ndivhuho Mafela, Head: Stakeholder Relations, Marketing and Communications. 

She said according to Proactive funding, in line with the Lotteries Act, the Commission may, upon request by the Minister, Board or on its own initiative conduct research on worthy good causes that may be funded without lodging an application. 

"This includes emergencies. Through this mechanism, funding is able to reach the most vulnerable members of society and provide much-needed relief in emergency situations."

Other notable donations include a R1 billion pledge  from the Rupert and Oppenheimer families to to assist small businesses and their employees affected by the coronavirus pandemic. 

IOL 

Share this article:

Related Articles