Independent Online

Wednesday, May 18, 2022

Like us on FacebookFollow us on TwitterView weather by locationView market indicators

My Fellow South Africans: Siza Magubane

My Fellow South Africans: Siza Magubane. Differential mechanic Siza Magubane is studying mechanical engineering while doing an apprenticeship. Photographed by Theo Jeptha (African News Agency/ANA)

My Fellow South Africans: Siza Magubane. Differential mechanic Siza Magubane is studying mechanical engineering while doing an apprenticeship. Photographed by Theo Jeptha (African News Agency/ANA)

Published May 5, 2022

Share

“I don’t have religion, but I believe in a higher power,” Siza Magubane says, sitting in a workshop in Durban.

Magubane is a differential mechanic doing an apprenticeship at Autogear while studying to become a fully qualified mechanical engineer.

Story continues below Advertisement

It’s not easy work – differential repairs on vehicles are hard work even when you don’t need to dismantle many parts of a vehicle just to get to the differential. Once there, you need to completely dismantle this complex part in order to ascertain what’s wrong with it before you can even begin to fix it.

“I currently work as a diff mechanic. I’ve always wanted to become a mechanical engineer,” Magubane says.

“I am still working on becoming a qualified engineer. I’m currently studying mechanical engineering and am doing an apprenticeship at Autogear in Durban.”

My Fellow South Africans: Siza Magubane may be working his complex magic on differentials by day, but in his spare time he’s a reggae artist. Photographed by Theo Jeptha (African News Agency/ANA)

Magubane is frustrated by the crime he experiences and hears about.

“One thing about Durban I don’t like is crime. I cannot take that the young and children and women are getting killed on a daily basis.”

The aspiring engineer is an avid musician, something he says not many people know about him.

Story continues below Advertisement

“Something that people don’t really know about me is that I am a reggae artist, and that reggae music is my life.”

Magubane would tell his younger self to place more value on his academic endeavours.

“My advice to a 15 year old? Keep on studying and pushing no matter how difficult it is because they will eventually reap success.”

Story continues below Advertisement

And what is it Magubane loves most about being South African?

“The food and the women,” he laughs.

* My Fellow South Africans is an editorial campaign powered by IOL which aims to build a more inclusive society by introducing South Africans to each other.

Story continues below Advertisement

Share