Suspended Cricket SA chief executive Thabang Moroe to resign. Photo: Christiaan Kotze/BackpagePix
IT’S ironic, although highly fitting, that it took a high handed and totally unjustified act against one of this country’s finest sports journalists to lance the throbbing chancre threatening cricket in this country.

Stuart Hess found out he had been muzzled last Sunday; his accreditation to enter cricket grounds and cover games summarily and silently revoked making it impossible for him to do the job he loves and does so well.

When he took to social media to protest, he could not have foreseen the consequences that would unfold.

He wasn’t the only one sent to Coventry by an executive unused to actual real reporting and determined only to have slavish stories published about the administration of a sport that is now a faint shadow of the colossus that once bestrode the ovals of the world; there were four others.

It is testimony to Hess’s standing, locally and internationally, that the outcry that ensued was felt in the boardrooms of corporate South Africa. The prompt resignation of two Cricket South Africa directors on principle and the widespread rebellion of provincial cricket boards followed.

In less than a week, three CSA officials have been suspended and on Friday, the most high-profile scalp of them all, chief executive Thabang Moroe.

It should never have come to this. The metastasising of the mismanagement to this existential crisis certainly didn’t happen overnight and won’t be quickly resolved.

South Africa will in all probability lose the coming tour against England to add to the ignominy of the World Cup exit earlier this year. It is a tragic state of affairs considering the depth of talent available.

Cricket South Africa can bounce back, but to do so will demand resolve and a purpose to serve - neither of which have been immediately apparent for some time now. We sincerely hope there are people with the best interests of the game who will put themselves forward to do just that.