Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa told BRICS bloc leaders that his country is determined to “leapfrog its development and growth.” Picture: Itumeleng English/African News Agency (ANA)

Johannesburg - Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa on Friday told BRICS bloc leaders that his country is determined to “leapfrog its development and growth.”

Mnangagwa formed part of a delegation of the nine African country leaders and Southern African Development Community members who were invited to participate in the BRICS Outreach Dialogue session at the 10th BRICS Summit at the Sandton Convention Centre in Johannesburg.

He highlighted that the BRICS gathering came at an important time in the history of Zimbabwe as the country prepares to hold its general elections on July 30.

“I consider it essential to be present in this forum and have a rare opportunity to exchange views as you usher in the 10th BRICS Forum,” Mnangagwa said.

He added the theme adopted by the Summit - “BRICS in Africa: Collaboration for Inclusive Growth and Shared Prosperity in the 4th Industrial Revolution” resonated with his country’s aspirations.

As Zimbabwe heads to the polls, Mnangagwa has been painstakingly trying to revive Zimbabwe’s image on the international stage in a bid to woo critical investment needed in the country that has faced a debilitating economic crisis over the years.

A seemingly confident Mnangagwa told those at the gathering that his country was preparing itself for a new era as it works hard to industrialise and modernise all sectors as well as double its economy.

“We want to be a middle-income country with decent jobs, broad-based empowerment free from poverty and corruption by 2030.”

He added: “As we go home, we carry a sense that better days are coming” saying “Zimbabwe stands ready to enhance collaboration, inclusive growth and shared responsibility for all.”

He urged BRICS countries to remain steadfast in creating a multilateral and inclusive system.

Mnangagwa also used the platform to assure the countries present that systems were in place to run successful elections in Zimbabwe saying they would be “peaceful, fair and credible.”

Political Bureau