Former deputy minister of higher education Mduduzi Manana Picture: David Ritchie/African News Agency (ANA) Archives

Johannesburg - The co-chairperson of the joint ethics committee says he is yet to receive an official letter of Mduduzi Manana's resignation from the Speaker's office.

Manana, the former deputy minister of higher education, announced his resignation as a Member of Parliament (MP) a day before he was set to face a hearing by the ethics committee into his conduct relating to his assault of three women at a Joburg nightclub. 

“I have decided to voluntarily withdraw my membership from the National Assembly after almost 10 years of active participation in parliamentary politics,” he said in a statement issued on Tuesday.

According to reports, Parliament spokesperson Moloto Mothapo said that they were yet to receive Manana's resignation letter.

Aumsensingh Singh, speaking on 702, also said he was yet to receive the letter following his request to Parliament and the Speaker's office. 

"My mandate will only start when I receive an official letter from the Speaker of the National Assembly," he said. 

"I've requested that letter after the rumours spread last night. I got many calls from the media [saying] that they've heard of this and they're asking for a comment. Thereafter I immediately got in touch with Parliament and the Speaker's office," he said.

Explaining the next step once the letter has been received, Singh said that the committee can no longer proceed with a matter once a member resigns.

Also reacting to news of Manana's resignation was the Women's Legal Centre, who said the resignation was long overdue and that it was problematic that the matter had dragged on for such a long time

Advocate Bronwyn Pithey, a legal practitioner at the WLC, also questioned the timing of Manana's resignation, especially since Manana had previously indicated that he had no intention of resigning as an MP despite his conviction. 

"The question remains is why now, why suddenly now has he resigned," she said.