Former Prasa CEO Lucky Montana. File picture: David Ritchie/ANA.

Former Prasa boss Lucky Montana has branded a SA Revenue Service (Sars) move to attach his assets as vindictive, unethical and an attempt to "intimidate" him to abandon his appearance at the state capture inquiry.

Earlier, Daily Maverick reported that Sars had obtained warrants of execution to attach two luxury vehicles and "other moveable property" belonging to Montana over unpaid taxes of around R1.8 million.

According to the news site, the warrants were issued after Sars obtained a judgment against Montana in the North Gauteng High Court and instruct the sheriff to attach moveable property owned by the former Prasa boss, stored at two of the six upmarket properties owned or associated with Montana.

Montana said in a statement the action by Sars was not unexpected, saying it had been going on for the past two years.

"I owe the taxman an amount of around R1.6m arising from the sale of two properties – capital gains tax (CGT). Sars had brought this to my attention through my tax adviser. 

"I agreed to settle the amount as soon as I have disposed of another property, which Sars was informed of.

"I am fully aware of my obligation to the tax authorities, and the role that this play in our lives. I have never disputed the amount owed to Sars and have made a firm commitment to settle this. 

"However, the latest action by Sars is clearly vindictive, unethical and smacks of abuse of power by the new clique running Sars. 

"I was never served with the summons to defend the matter. The sheriff of the court arrived at my home this morning with a warrant of execution."

Montana claimed the move was motivated by a "vendetta" by a former Shosholoza Meyl CEO fired for corruption and was an attempt to "intimidate and embarrass" him, to get him to drop his testimony before the Zondo Commission. 

"It was not a coincidence that Sars decided to contact me directly immediately after I stated my intention to testify before the Zondo Commission. 

"The latest action is a clear indication to me that they have also seen my detailed submission to the Zondo Commission, which indicates the roles of former Sars executives in unlawful activities.

"This is aimed at embarrassing and intimidating me to abandon my testimony before the commission. The Zondo Commission itself has tried to 'pressurise' me to drop some aspects of my statement. 

"I had refused and withdrew from testifying before the commission," he said.

Montana vowed to report the "unethical conduct and abuse of power" with the Tax Ombudsman.

IOL