Cape Town - South Africa and Namibia signed three co-operation agreements on Tuesday after talks between delegations of the two countries.

President Jacob Zuma hosted his Namibian counterpart Hifikepunye Pohamba at the meeting, which was aimed at strengthening co-operation in various areas.

Briefing reporters afterwards, Zuma said the delegations reviewed progress made in bilateral co-operation and partnership.

“We paid particular focus on key areas such as trade and investment, energy, transport, environment, science and technology, education, tourism, and security issues.”

He said every effort would be made to ensure the three agreements were put into effect.

Earlier on Tuesday, an agreement to establish a bi-national commission was signed. It would meet every year, alternating between Pretoria and Windhoek.

Four sub-commissions - diplomatic, economic, social, and defence and security - would be established.

The countries' public works ministries signed a memorandum of understanding.

This would provide for co-operation in areas such as infrastructure development, and exchange programmes in building and engineering.

A similar pact on co-operation in meteorology was also finalised.

According to a document handed out at the briefing, the SA Weather Service had already been providing Namibia with technical support and training in this field.

Pohamba described talks with Zuma and his delegation as fruitful.

“The two delegations reviewed and exchanged views on regional and international issues, especially of regional economic integration within the framework of the Southern African Development Community and the African Union,” he said. - Sapa